Cup O' Coffee and the Sunday Paper

Hoping you’re having a loungy, lazy Sunday. Here’s a few of the articles I read this past week I liked quite a bit.

1

On Likability by Lacy M. Johnson - This one says a lot about what’s wrong with our society.

My daughter comes home from school at least once a week and announces to me that no one likes her. She has done something that is too weird, or bold, or has said a thing with which others disagree. She has had to sit alone during lunch or play alone during recess. She even sat on the buddy bench, she tells me, and no one came.

 

2

While the average nursing home costs $188 per day, Robison wrote that reservations at the hotel chain cost $59.23 per night with both a long-term stay and senior discount. Factor in free breakfast and happy hour and Robison calculated that would leave $128.77 a day for food and entertainment.

Not to mention, Robison said Holiday Inns offer a spa, swimming pool, workout room, laundry room and a lounge. Of course, complimentary shampoo, soap, toothpaste and razors will rack up savings, too.

Securing a room at the right nursing home may take months, but Robison said reservations for quality customer service can be made now.

 

3

What happens when you get off Facebook for four weeks? Stanford researchers found out by Kurt Wagner, Recode - Definitely one “I Liked” and shared with my “Friends”

How much would you need to be paid to give up your Facebook account for four weeks?

That was the question a group of researchers from Stanford asked thousands of Facebook users last year in an effort to better understand how the social network affected issues such as political polarization and mental well-being.

The study — which paid some users to abandon Facebook and encouraged others to give it up by using just their self-control — found that cutting Facebook out of your life has a number of consequences. Many of them are positive.

 

4

Come with me this morning to the church within our hearts, where the bells are always ringing, and the preacher whose name is Love — shall intercede for us!
— Emily Dickinson

Four months before her twentieth birthday, Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830–May 15, 1886) met the person who became her first love and remained her greatest — an orphaned mathematician-in-training by the name of Susan Gilbert, nine days her junior. Throughout the poet’s life, Susan would be her muse, her mentor, her primary reader and editor, her fiercest lifelong attachment, her “Only Woman in the World.”